Heart-Healthy Living Also Wards Off Type 2 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) — There could be an added bonus to keeping your cardiovascular health on track — a heart-healthy lifestyle can also prevent type 2 diabetes, researchers say. And it’s better to prevent type 2 diabetes than to have to treat it, the Ohio State University researchers added. “Healthy people need…

Two-Thirds of Poor U.S. Women Can't Afford Menstrual Pads, Tampons: Study

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) — A study of nearly 200 poor women living in the St. Louis area found that two out of three had to go without feminine hygiene products at least once over the prior year, due to cost. About one-fifth — 21 percent — said this happened on a monthly…

Want to Live Longer? Just Sit a Bit Less Each Day

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Take a stand for a longer life. Researchers say even a few extra minutes off the sofa each day can add years to your life span. “If you have a job or lifestyle that involves a lot of sitting, you can lower your risk of early death by…

Teen Birth Control Use Up, But Still Too Many Unwanted Pregnancies

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Today’s teens are better at using birth control when they first become sexually active, but many unexpected pregnancies still occur, new research finds. Teens who didn’t use birth control during their first month of sexual activity faced nearly a fourfold increase in the risk of an unwanted pregnancy…

Vaccines: Not Just for Kids

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) — If you have children, you know how important it is to keep up with their immunization schedule. But getting vaccines and booster shots is vital throughout adulthood as well. The most common adult shot is the yearly flu vaccine, recommended for just about every adult. Some fight three…

Gay Dads and Their Kids Still Face Social Shaming

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Two-thirds of gay fathers have felt the pain of social stigma, and they have encountered that stigma most often in religious settings, a new survey shows. “We were not surprised that stigma is still experienced by gay fathers,” said study author Dr. Ellen Perrin. “But we did not…

U.S. Flu Cases Hit 7 Million Mark: CDC

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The flu season is picking up steam, with about 7 million Americans having been struck by a strain of the flu virus, health officials said Friday. Almost half of those folks went to a doctor, while between 69,000 and 84,000 people have been hospitalized for flu-related illness, the…

AHA: New Cholesterol Guidelines Put Ethnicity in the Spotlight

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (American Heart Association) — As in most things, family matters. Specifically, your family’s ethnicity could make a difference, at least when it comes to cholesterol and your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. In a recent update of cholesterol guidelines, a national panel of scientists and health experts stressed…

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients Get Short Shrift in ERs

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Many chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) patients say they aren’t taken seriously when they arrive in hospital emergency rooms, a new study finds. It included 282 people with diagnosed CFS who completed an online questionnaire. Of those, only 59 percent had gone to the emergency department (ED) for treatment…

Fatal Drug ODs Soaring Among Middle-Aged Women: CDC

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The rate at which middle-aged American women die from overdoses involving opioids and other drugs nearly quadrupled between 1999 and 2017, new government data shows. In 1999, about seven out of every 100,000 deaths among U.S. women aged 30 to 64 was caused by a drug overdose, but…

Wider Waistlines, Smaller Brains?

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Obese people tend to show shrinkage in their brain tissue by middle age — especially if the extra pounds are concentrated in the belly, a new study suggests. The study, of more than 9,600 U.K. adults, found that those who were obese typically had a lower volume of…

Trying Whole30 Diet? Watch Out for Weight Regain

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Thinking of eating healthier in 2019? Kickstarting with the Whole30 diet may be a good choice, a dietitian suggests. But you have to be careful when you start a diet that restricts foods. These diets can be risky, according to Ohio State’s Lori Chong, a certified diabetes educator.…

Use of Common Epilepsy Drug in Pregnancy Tied to ADHD in Kids

FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) — When a woman with epilepsy uses the anti-seizure drug valproate during a pregnancy, the odds that her baby will go on to develop ADHD rise, a new study suggests. The Danish report can’t prove that valproate causes attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in these cases, only that there’s an association.…

Flu Widening Its Grip on the United States: CDC

FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The flu is now spreading throughout the United States, health officials said Friday. Since last week, when nine states and New York City were reporting high flu activity, 19 states and New York City are now seeing a lot of flu, and it’s widespread in 24 states, according…

As You Age, Alcohol May Be Harder to Handle

FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Seniors may be more vulnerable to alcoholism, a psychologist warns. “As we age, it takes longer for the body to break down alcohol. It stays in the system longer. Tolerance also decreases. Excessive drinking can compromise your immune system and can lead to some forms of cancer,” said…

AHA: Lifestyle Changes Helped New Dad Shed Nearly 50 Pounds

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 (American Heart Association) — It happens every January. Gyms fill with people who’ve committed to New Year’s resolutions involving health and fitness. While making a resolution is an important first step, developing new habits is the key to long-term success, said Erik Minaya, who has maintained significant weight loss for several…

No Link Between Mom-to-Be's Diet, Baby's Allergy Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Avoiding certain foods during pregnancy does not reduce your child’s risk of food allergies, a new analysis shows. For the study, researchers examined data from a 2005 to 2007 survey of 4,900 pregnant women who were part of a U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease…

New Cholesterol Drug's High Price May Not Be Worth It: Study

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Despite being slashed by half in recent months, the price tag for advanced cholesterol-fighting drugs is still too high to make them cost-effective, a new analysis has concluded. In March, the manufacturer of alirocumab (Praluent) announced that it would cut the cost of the medication from $14,000 a…

U.S. Opioid Addiction Crisis Is Top Health Story of 2018

THURSDAY, Dec. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The scourge of opioid addiction and related deaths cut through American society again in 2018, capturing headlines and making it the year’s top health story. Rates of opioid-linked fatal overdoses have nearly doubled over the past decade and topped 70,000 in 2017, according to data released in November…

Alcohol May Be Sabotaging Your Diet

MONDAY, Dec. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Alcohol. It’s a fixture at New Year’s parties, but it’s also is a calorie guzzler — one drink can eat up 10 percent or more of a dieter’s daily allotment, depending on how fanciful the beverage is. And there are other ways booze can undermine your wellness efforts.…

Could a Little Drinking Help Those With Heart Failure?

FRIDAY, Dec. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A new study suggests that an occasional drink won’t harm, and might even help seniors with heart failure. Heart failure patients who drank in moderation — a drink a day for women, two for men — had an average survival that was a year longer than nondrinkers, the…

Guidelines for a Healthy Pregnancy

FRIDAY, Dec. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) — If you’re pregnant you already know the importance of eating a healthful diet and taking prenatal vitamins, including folic acid and possibly B12 and iron supplements. What not to do isn’t always clear, however. There’s no doubt about the hazards of smoking — to you and baby. But…

Kidney Disease Risk Tied to Sugar-Sweetened Drinks

THURSDAY, Dec. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — People who drink lots of sugar-sweetened drinks may be putting themselves at a heightened risk for kidney disease, a new study suggests. The study of more than 3,000 black men and women in Mississippi found that those who consumed the most soda, sweetened fruit drinks and water had…

PTSD Drug May Do More Harm Than Good

THURSDAY, Dec. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A drug used to treat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may actually be harmful, a new study suggests. The high blood pressure drug prazosin is sometimes used to treat PTSD-related nightmares and insomnia that can increase suicide risk. But this small study suggests the drug may make nightmares and…

Is Your State a Hotspot for Obesity-Linked Cancers?

THURSDAY, Dec. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — What state you call home may have a great deal to do with your chances of developing an obesity-related cancer, a new report suggests. A nearly twofold difference exists between U.S. states with the highest and lowest proportion of obesity-related cancers, American Cancer Society researchers have found. The…

One Woman's Case Gives New Hope Against Disfiguring Sarcoidosis

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — In very preliminary findings, an existing rheumatoid arthritis drug appeared to cure one woman of a rare but potentially life-threatening condition known as sarcoidosis. After 10 months of use, tofacitinib (Xeljanz) appeared to eliminate all symptoms for the woman, who’d tried numerous standard treatments to no avail. Sarcoidosis…

Short People Fare Worse in ICUs: Study

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Shorter patients in hospital intensive care units (ICUs) are more likely to die during treatment than taller ones, a new study suggests. Among more than 400,000 critically ill adults, the shortest patients (4 feet, 6 inches) were 29 percent (men) and 24 percent (women) more likely to die…

Take Time for 'Me Time'

MONDAY, Dec. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Husband or wife, mom or dad, the demands on your time can be overwhelming. But even if there’s no end to your to-do list, securing some time for yourself is a must. While scheduling a mani-pedi or catching a ball game with friends is great, simply closing your…

A New Mom Shape-Up: Stroller Walking

MONDAY, Dec. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The exhaustion of a new baby can have negative fitness consequences as you lose the motivation to exercise and feel there’s no time to get to the gym. But not exercising actually worsens fatigue, makes it harder to lose your baby weight, and increases the risk of chronic…

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Has Lung Cancer Surgery

FRIDAY, Dec. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) — U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg underwent surgery for lung cancer at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City on Friday. “Two nodules in the lower lobe of her left lung were discovered incidentally during tests performed at George Washington University Hospital to diagnose and…

#MeToo Sparked Surge in Awareness About Sexual Harassment: Study

FRIDAY, Dec. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Hundreds of thousands of women have used the #MeToo hashtag to speak out about sexual harassment and assault during the past year. Now there’s evidence that the #MeToo movement sparked more than mere conversation about sexual abuse in the United States. Google searches for information about sexual harassment…

Take High Blood Pressure Meds? Exercise Might Work Just as Well

TUESDAY, Dec. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) — If you have high blood pressure, hitting the gym may be as helpful as taking drugs to lower your numbers, researchers say. There’s “compelling evidence that combining endurance and dynamic resistance training was effective in reducing [blood pressure],” according to the authors of a new report. The British…

Heart Failure Takes Heavy Toll, Even for Those With Stronger Hearts

TUESDAY, Dec. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Having a stronger heart after being hospitalized for heart failure may not translate into a better outcome, new research suggests. Levels of physical and mental decline were similar among patients with weaker or stronger hearts, and surprisingly, those with stronger hearts had higher rates of depression and lower…

AHA: Barbershops Help Trim High Blood Pressure Numbers for Black Men

MONDAY, Dec. 17, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Barbershops in the African-American community could help men reduce and control their blood pressure, according to a new study. The research showed long-term reductions in blood pressure among customers who met periodically with pharmacists at 52 Los Angeles County barbershops. Published Dec. 17 in the American Heart…

Migraine's 'Silver Lining': Lowered Risk for Diabetes?

MONDAY, Dec. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A study of more than 74,000 French women has turned up an unexpected finding: Those who suffer from migraines have a significantly lower risk for type 2 diabetes. The finding is based on surveys sent to thousands of women born between 1925 and 1950. The study found that…

Fast Facts for Men (and Women) About High Cholesterol

MONDAY, Dec. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — High cholesterol, a serious risk factor for heart disease, can affect both men and women, and it’s common for cholesterol levels to rise with age. But it’s often a problem for men earlier in life than for women. A study published in the Journal of the American College…

Father-Son Talks About Condoms Pay Health Dividends

MONDAY, Dec. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Here’s some straight talk about the value of “the talk.” Fathers who talk with their teenage sons about condom use can help prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unplanned pregnancies, researchers say. Condoms are the only contraceptive method that can prevent pregnancy and the spread of sexually transmitted…

Docs Should Screen for Depression During, After Pregnancy

MONDAY, Dec. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Doctors should screen women for depression during and after pregnancy, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says in an updated policy statement. Undiagnosed and untreated depression among pregnant women and new mothers can put a baby’s health at risk, and is one of the most common and costly…

Do Paramedics Shortchange Women With Heart Trouble?

MONDAY, Dec. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women who call 911 for a possible heart attack may get different treatment from paramedics than men do, a new U.S. study suggests. Researchers found that ambulance crews were less likely to give recommended treatments, such as aspirin, to women with chest pain. Paramedics were also less likely…

U.S. Flu Activity Low Right Now, but Rising: CDC

FRIDAY, Dec. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Flu season is getting off to a slow but steady start, a U.S. health official said Friday. As of now, only Georgia is seeing high levels of infections, but cases are being reported throughout the nation. “Flu activity is still fairly low, but as expected we have been…

AHA: Thyroid Problems Linked to Worsening Heart Failure

FRIDAY, Dec. 14, 2018 (American Heart Association) — The thyroid is a tiny powerhouse. The gland, which is located at the base of the neck, releases hormones that control how the entire body uses energy and affects an array of organs throughout the body – including the heart. Now, a new study from researchers at…

Could You Have Silent Gallstones?

FRIDAY, Dec. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — As many as 20 million Americans have gallstones. Most don’t have any symptoms, but not all will escape a gallstone attack. The gallbladder is a small organ in the upper right abdomen. It’s a reservoir for bile, the fluid made by the liver to aid digestion. Experts aren’t…

Women Doctors Say They're Penalized for Motherhood

THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women juggling a medical career and motherhood often face significant workplace discrimination, a new study finds. Researchers conducted an online survey of U.S. doctors who were mothers. The age range was 24 to 62, and most worked more than 40 hours a week. Common complaints included less chance…

Intimacy: The Elusive Fountain of Youth?

THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — People seeking more satisfaction in their later years might find sex is the spice of life, new research suggests. For the study, researchers analyzed survey data from nearly 6,900 older adults, average age 65, in England. The investigators found that those who said they’d had any type of…

Extreme Dieting in Teens Often Intensifies in Adulthood

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Extreme dieting behaviors often begin in the teen years and worsen in adulthood, a new study finds. Unhealthy weight-control behaviors — such as purging and fasting — are associated with problems later in life, including eating disorders, depression and substance abuse, according to researchers at the University of…

Certain Female Vets May Face Higher Dementia Risk

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The toll of U.S. military service can be steep for female veterans, with depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and brain injury each significantly raising the odds of later dementia, new research suggests. The study, of more than 100,000 older women veterans, spotlights the risk factors stemming from military service…

More Sleep in Seattle: Later Start to School Brings Kids Better Grades

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Would delaying the start of school help sleep-deprived teens get more of the shut-eye they need? Yes, suggests a Seattle experiment that assessed how adolescent sleep habits changed after the opening school bell shifted from 7:50 a.m. to 8:45 a.m. The result: high school students ended up clocking…

'Easy Way Out'? Stigma May Keep Many From Weight Loss Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For many obese people, weight loss surgery can be a new lease on life, but too few who qualify for the procedure opt for it. One big reason: The widespread notion that surgery is an “easy way out,” signifying a weakness of willpower to slim down using diet…

How the Mediterranean Diet Can Help Women's Hearts

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women who stick to a Mediterranean diet have a 25 percent lower risk of heart disease — and researchers say they’re starting to understand why. “Our study has a strong public health message that modest changes in known cardiovascular disease risk factors, particularly those relating to inflammation, glucose…

Younger Breast Cancer Survivors Suffer More Bone Loss From Treatment

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Younger breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for osteoporosis — weak, brittle bones — due to breast cancer treatments, new study finds. The study included 211 women who had been diagnosed with breast cancer within the past nearly three years and 567 women with no history of…

Hospitalizations Rising Among the Homeless

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — On any given night in America, more than 550,000 people are homeless, and they are being hospitalized in greater numbers, a new study suggests. Despite expanded Medicaid and increased funds for health care clinics, hospitalizations among this vulnerable population are rising, said lead researcher Dr. Rishi Wadhera. He…

When Heart Attack Strikes, Women Often Hesitate to Call for Help

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women often delay calling for emergency help when heart attack symptoms start, a new study finds. Researchers in Switzerland found that women suffering a heart attack typically waited 37 minutes longer than men before calling an ambulance. And those delays showed no signs of improving over the 16-year…

Do Diabetics Really Need to Fast for Blood Tests?

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Fasting before a cholesterol blood test is just a nuisance for most people, but for those with diabetes, it can be dangerous. New research shows that up to 22 percent of people with diabetes who fasted for lab tests had a low blood sugar episode (hypoglycemia) while waiting…

Insights Into Women and Stroke Risk

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — You might be surprised to learn that stroke is the number three killer of women. Women and men have many of the same risk factors for stroke, but some — like high blood pressure, migraine with aura, diabetes and stress — tend to be stronger or more common…

For College Students, 'Hookup Sex' More Intimate Than Thought

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Intimacy plays a larger role in casual sex among college students than previously thought, a new U.S. study reports. Researchers analyzed the results of an online survey that asked several hundred students at a university in the Northeast about their romantic relationships and casual sex. As expected, affectionate…

AHA: Sleep Apnea May Double Odds for High Blood Pressure in Blacks

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Black adults with high blood pressure that defies standard prescription treatments might want to get screened for sleep apnea, new research suggests. Moderate or severe sleep apnea — in which a person can experience pauses in breathing five to 30 times an hour or more — was…

Sleep, Don't Cram, Before Finals for Better Grades

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — It’s a college tradition to pull “all-nighters” during final exams. But students may get better grades if they simply go to bed early, two new studies suggest. Researchers found that students who met an “8-hour sleep challenge” during finals week did better on their exams than those who…

To Track Carbs, Tap Into the Glycemic Index … and Its Cousin

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Rather than just counting carbs, you might want to get familiar with the glycemic index and the glycemic load, numeric weighting systems that rank carb-based foods based on how much they raise blood sugar. While monitoring these indicators might be especially helpful for those with diabetes, they also…

Opioids Exact Another Toll on Newborns: Smaller Heads

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Infants born addicted to opioids may be more likely to have smaller heads that might hinder their development, new research suggests. “Babies chronically exposed to opiates [during pregnancy] had a head size about a centimeter smaller” than babies born to moms not using drugs, said lead researcher Dr.…

Kidney Disease More Deadly for Men

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Chronic kidney disease is more likely to progress to kidney failure and death in men than in women, a new study reveals. “We found that women had 17 percent lower risk of experiencing [kidney failure] and the risk of death was 31 percent lower in women than in…

Too Much Salt Might Help Spur A-Fib

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A high-salt diet could raise your risk for a common heart rhythm disorder, new research suggests. Atrial fibrillation (A-fib) is a quivering or irregular heartbeat that can lead to blood clots or other complications. It affects millions of people worldwide and puts them at higher risk for stroke…

AHA: A Black Filmmaker's Look at the Heart (Health) of Her Community

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Jasmine Johnson has become reacquainted with the South Dallas neighborhood where she grew up. Much is familiar, but she’s noticed there aren’t many places that sell fresh food. The 29-year-old filmmaker is determined to bring attention to the issue for a community riddled with diabetes, high blood…

Better Economy Could Mean Worse Nursing Home Care

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — In a good economy, the care at U.S. nursing homes falls because it’s harder to attract and keep staff, a new study contends. “During economic downturns, many people are willing to take positions with work environments they may not prefer because there aren’t many options,” said principal investigator…

For Younger Cancer Patients, Mastectomy vs. Breast-Conserving Surgery

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Younger breast cancer patients who have one or both breasts removed have lower levels of satisfaction and well-being than those who have breast-conserving surgery, a new study finds. The study included 560 women diagnosed with breast cancer by age 40. Of those, 28 percent had breast-conserving surgery and…

Incontinence Drug May Cut Hot Flashes in Breast Cancer Survivors

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Hot flashes, a common curse in menopause, can be especially bothersome after breast cancer. But a new study suggests an existing medication may help. The drug is oxybutynin (Ditropan XL), long used to treat urinary incontinence. The study found that women taking the medicine had an average of…

Healthy Lifestyle Lowers Odds of Breast Cancer's Return

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — There’s more evidence that when a survivor of early stage breast cancer takes up healthy eating and regular exercise, the odds of the disease returning go down. The key is sticking with such programs, said study lead author Dr. Wolfgang Janni. Healthier lifestyles “might improve the prognosis of…

Breast Cancer Deadlier for Black Women, Despite Same Treatments

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Even with the same treatment, black women with the most common form of breast cancer experience higher recurrence and death rates than white women, a new trial reveals. The finding pokes holes in the prevailing notion that black women with breast cancer fare worse due to less access…

Obesity May Be Driving Rise in Uterine Cancers

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Cases of uterine cancer are charting a slow but steady rise among American women, and so are deaths from the disease, new statistics show. Looking at federal health data, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that “during 1999-2015, uterine cancer incidence rates increased…

Obesity Ups Survival in Heart Failure, but That's No Reason to Pile on Pounds

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Obese people with heart failure may live longer than those who are thinner — especially if they are “metabolically healthy,” a new study suggests. The study, of more than 3,500 heart failure patients, is the latest to look into the so-called “obesity paradox.” The term refers to a…

Tamoxifen at a Lower Dose Might Still Prevent Breast Cancer's Return

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Tamoxifen is considered a vital weapon in the fight against breast cancer, but many women who have to take the drug struggle with its significant side effects. Now, new research shows that a lower dose of the hormone therapy helped prevent breast cancer from returning and guarded against…

Fewer Early Stage Breast Cancer Patients May Need Lymph Node Removal: Study

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For many breast cancer patients, removal of lymph nodes in the armpit area is a common procedure, due to worries that the tumor has spread to these tissues. But the operation can also bring the difficult long-term side effect of lymphedema, a painful arm swelling. Now, new Dutch…

Another Plus to Cardiac Rehab: Better Sex

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Heart patients taking part in cardiac rehabilitation could receive a spicy side effect from the program — a boost in their sex life. Attending cardiac rehab is associated with improved sexual function and more frequent sex, according to a new evidence review. The program likely helps by increasing…

Scans, Ultrasound Spot Zika Brain Defects

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Ultrasounds and MRIs during pregnancy and after birth can detect most Zika-related brain abnormalities in infants, researchers report. If a woman is infected with the Zika virus during pregnancy, her child can be born with microcephaly and other severe brain defects, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and…

AHA: How to Stop Smoking … for Good

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Nobody knows who first said, “To succeed, you first have to fail.” But it’s a phrase many smokers likely relate to. About half of all smokers try to quit each year, according to federal data. But only about 7 percent are successful. “We’ve heard about people who…

An App, Your Fingernail — and Anemia Screening Is Done

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Checking for low hemoglobin in the blood — otherwise known as anemia — usually means drawing blood for testing. But scientists say they’ve developed a wireless smartphone app that does the same by “reading” a quick photo of your fingernail. The app converts fingernail colors into quick readings…

More Green Space May Mean a Healthier Heart

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Living in a neighborhood with lots of greenery just might protect your ticker. “Our study shows that living in a neighborhood dense with trees, bushes and other green vegetation may be good for the health of your heart and blood vessels,” said study author Aruni Bhatnagar, director of…

New Chlamydia Test Offers Rapid Results

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A new test for chlamydia can provide results within 30 minutes, potentially speeding up the start of treatment, researchers say. The rapid test for the sexually transmitted disease (STD) means patients can receive treatment immediately, instead of having to wait for a follow-up appointment. This could help reduce…

Tip the Scale in Your Favor

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Whether you track your diet efforts on paper or with an app, frequent and consistent self-monitoring contributes to success. However, one aspect of recordkeeping — how often to get on the scale — has been the subject of much debate. Daily weigh-ins used to be thought of as…

Drug Halves Tumor Recurrence for Women With a Common Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For certain women with early stage breast cancer, a newer drug that combines an antibody with chemotherapy may cut the risk of disease recurrence in half, a new trial finds. The study focused on nearly 1,500 women with early stage breast cancer that was HER2-positive — meaning it…

World's First Baby Born From Deceased Donor's Transplanted Uterus

TUESDAY, Dec. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The world’s first baby born to a woman who had a uterus transplant from a deceased donor shows that such transplants can be successful, Brazilian doctors say. The 6-pound baby girl was delivered by C-section to an unidentified young woman who had been born without a uterus. The…

Obamacare Helped More Women Access Care Before Pregnancy: Study

TUESDAY, Dec. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Ever since the Affordable Care Act expanded Medicaid in some states, more women have received health care before pregnancy, a new study finds. The number of women who had Medicaid in the month before pregnancy rose from 31 percent to 36 percent in states that opted out of…

Toxic Amounts of Vitamin D Spur Dog Food Recall

TUESDAY, Dec. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Eight brands of dry dog food have been recalled because of potentially deadly amounts of vitamin D, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. Vitamin D is an important nutrient for dogs. But too much can cause symptoms such as vomiting, appetite loss, increased thirst and urination, excessive…

AHA: Hearts From Unusual Donors Could Help Meet Growing Transplant Demand

TUESDAY, Dec. 4, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Researchers say the ever-growing waiting list of hopeful heart transplant recipients could be trimmed down if only more patients were given the option to open their hearts to unlikely donors. Two new Stanford University-led studies published Dec. 4 explore opportunities to expand the donor pool by using…

Could Soaps, Shampoos Be Pushing Girls Into Early Puberty?

TUESDAY, Dec. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Exposure to chemicals found in a wide array of personal care products has been linked to early puberty among girls, a new investigation warns. The issue centers on specific chemicals including phthalates, parabens and phenols. They’re found in an array of products, including perfumes, soaps, shampoos, nail polish,…

Doctors More Cautious Now When Prescribing Opioids to Kids

MONDAY, Dec. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — There’s been a steady decline in opioid prescriptions for children and teens in the United States since 2012, a new study reveals. “Understanding patterns of opioid use in children and adolescents is important because use in early life has been associated with a higher likelihood of opioid misuse…

Some Types of Epilepsy Pose More Risks During Pregnancy

MONDAY, Dec. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women with frontal lobe epilepsy are much more likely to have an increase in seizures during pregnancy than those with focal epilepsy or generalized epilepsy, researchers report. “Physicians need to monitor women with focal epilepsy — especially frontal lobe epilepsy — more closely during pregnancy because maintaining seizure…

An Abusive Partner May Worsen Menopause Symptoms

FRIDAY, Nov. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Emotional abuse may add to the woes of menopause, a new study suggests. Researchers found that women who are emotionally tormented by a spouse or partner may suffer from more night sweats, painful sex and hot flashes when their periods stop. “The data show that experience of domestic…

AHA: Use Energy Drinks When Cramming for Exams? Your Heart May Pay a Price

FRIDAY, Nov. 30, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Final exams – and the ensuing all-night study sessions they cause – are looming large for many students across the country. But reaching for energy drinks to perk up those drooping eyelids and boost study performance could do more harm than good. Recent research shows just one…

Healthy Lifestyle Makes for a Healthy Heart During Menopause

FRIDAY, Nov. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women who live a healthy lifestyle during the transition to menopause may help keep their blood vessels healthy as they age, a new study suggests. Compared with women who had the least healthy lifestyle, those who led the healthiest lifestyle had less thickening and buildup of fatty plaque…

Carb Cycling: An Exercise in Weight Loss

FRIDAY, Nov. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Trying to choose between a high-carb and a low-carb diet? There’s a third option that might suit you even better. The concept is called carb cycling, shorthand for alternating between high- and low-carbohydrate days. There’s even a variation that lets you make every seventh day a cheat day.…

Meth, Opioid Use in Pregnancy on the Rise

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Methamphetamine and opioid use has soared among pregnant American women, putting the health of baby and mother at risk, a new study finds. While addiction among pregnant women has dramatically increased across the country, it disproportionally affects women living in rural America, where access to addiction treatment and…

AHA: It Took Heart Attack to Reveal Young Woman's Heart Defect

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Growing up, Alanna Gardner learned she couldn’t be too active. If she was, she would faint. Sometimes the spells prompted an emergency room visit. Doctors, however, never diagnosed the cause. Reluctantly, she gave up participating in sports. But after going away to college, Alanna started to wonder…

Cost Matters to Those Sizing Up Weight-Loss Surgery

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Cost and how much they can lose matter more to folks considering weight-loss surgery than recovery time or the risk of complications, a new study finds. “Instead of asking patients about the reasons for or against particular procedures, we asked patients to tell us what procedure characteristics mattered…

Snoring May Be Bigger Health Threat to Women Than Men

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The hearts of women who snore appear to become damaged more quickly than those of men who “saw lumber” at night, a new study suggests. Evaluating nearly 4,500 British adults who underwent cardiac imaging, researchers also learned that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may be vastly underdiagnosed among snorers.…

New Surgery Gets Amputee Moving Again — Without the 'Phantom Limb' Effect

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Climbing enthusiast Jim Ewing lost his left foot in the aftermath of a 50-foot fall off a Cayman Islands cliff. But Ewing is scaling rock walls again with the aid of a robotic ankle and foot he works as well as his former flesh-and-blood version, thanks to a…

Saunas Seem to Do a Heart Good, Research Shows

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Love your time in the local sauna? Your heart may love it, too. New research from sauna-loving Finland suggests that for people aged 50 and older, saunas may lower their odds of risk of dying from heart disease. Specifically, just 5 percent of Finns in the study who…

Opioid Crisis, Suicides Driving Decline in U.S. Life Expectancy: CDC

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Life expectancy in the United States has now declined for three years in a row, fueled largely by a record number of drug overdose deaths and rising suicide rates, new government statistics show. “It’s really the first time we’ve seen this multi-year drop” in decades, said Renee Gindi,…

For Some Women, Mammograms May Need to Begin at 30: Study

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women at increased risk for breast cancer should start receiving mammograms earlier than recommended, even as young as age 30, a new study contends. Young women who have dense breasts or a family history of breast cancer appear to benefit from regular mammograms as much as women in…

Obesity Boosts Childhood Asthma Risk by 30 Percent

MONDAY, Nov. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The wheezy lung disease asthma is yet one more problem linked to excess weight in childhood, a new study suggests. The research contends that as many as 10 percent of pediatric asthma cases in the United States could be avoided if childhood obesity were eliminated. “There are very…

What You Can Do to Prevent Diabetes

FRIDAY, Nov. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Type 2 diabetes has reached alarming numbers in the United States. But you can prevent or delay it through healthy eating and active living, an expert suggests. Diabetes affects more than 30 million Americans, and type 2 is the most common form. As many as one-third of Americans…

A Healthier Diet, a Healthier You

THURSDAY, Nov. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) — With more and more research uncovering the best foods for health, people are learning how important it is to focus on food quality to prevent weight gain and live longer. There are many approaches to consider. For instance, findings show that a diet high in fiber, especially from…

Night Shift Plus Unhealthy Habits Equals Higher Diabetes Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Rotating night-shift work together with an unhealthy lifestyle significantly increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, researchers say. “Most cases of type 2 diabetes could be prevented by adherence to a healthy lifestyle, and the benefits could be larger in rotating night-shift workers,” said study authors led by…

Give Thanks for These Foods That Help Preserve Aging Memory

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) — When your mom told you to eat your veggies and drink your orange juice, she was on to something: They may help preserve your brain health, new research suggests. A 20-year study of men who were health professionals tied a diet rich in leafy greens, orange and red…

AHA: Be Thankful for Cranberries' Health Benefits All Year Long

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21, 2018 (American Heart Association) — No respectable Thanksgiving plate is without some form of cranberry, but the fruit’s popularity seems to plummet the other 364 days of the year. That’s a shame, nutrition experts say, because cranberries deliver a bundle of health benefits. And they’re quite efficient: A cup of raw cranberries…

Influential U.S. Panel Backs PrEP HIV-Prevention Pills

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For the first time, a highly influential panel of experts says doctors should offer a daily pill to prevent HIV transmission to people who are at high risk for infection with the AIDS-causing virus. This treatment is called pre-exposure prophylaxis — PrEP for short — and it has…

Obesity All on Its Own Can Raise Your Health Risks

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Obesity itself raises odds for diabetes and heart disease, even in the absence of conditions like high blood pressure, a new study finds. “This study is important because we can conclude that it is not solely factors like high blood pressure, high cholesterol or lack of exercise that…

Opioids Increasingly Tied to Deaths of Pregnant Women

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — As the U.S. opioid epidemic rages unchecked, new research shows that pregnancy-related deaths due to opioid misuse more than doubled between 2007 and 2016. Deaths during or soon after pregnancy rose 34 percent during that time, and the percentage involving heroin, fentanyl or prescription painkillers (such as OxyContin)…

Are Food Additives Good or Bad? Consumer Views Vary

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Many Americans believe they face health risks from food additives, but plenty of others think that additives in small amounts won’t harm them, a new survey finds. It seems the United States is divided about the harms and benefits of modern food production practices. Specifically, 51 percent of…

Women as Tough as Men During Extreme Exertion

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women are no more likely than men to have health problems due to strenuous training and extreme physical exertion, researchers report. “Our findings contain some potentially myth-busting data on the impact of extreme physical activity on women. We have shown that with appropriate training and preparation, many of…

The Skinny on New Sugar Calorie Counts

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is getting serious about added sugars. Acting on the health recommendation that calories from added sugars shouldn’t exceed 10 percent of your daily total calories, new nutrition labels will break down a food’s sugar content so you can read how much added…

AHA: Have Diabetes? Make Sure to Manage Cholesterol, Too

MONDAY, Nov. 19, 2018 (American Heart Association) — For people with diabetes, blood sugar isn’t the only important measurement. New cholesterol guidelines suggest the more than 110 million U.S. adults with diabetes or prediabetes also should manage their cholesterol. The guidelines released earlier this month during the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions conference suggest doctors…

Here's More Evidence Obesity Can Shorten Your Life

FRIDAY, Nov. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A study that tracked the weight and survival of more than 6,000 Americans for 24 years reinforces the notion that piling on excess pounds can lead to an earlier grave. Being statistically obese, but not simply overweight, was tied to a 27 percent increase in the odds of…

The Jobs That Carry the Highest Suicide Risk

THURSDAY, Nov. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The rate of suicide among U.S. workers has jumped 34 percent since 2000, and certain occupations seem to be riskier than others, government health researchers report. Those most at risk: men with construction and extraction jobs, and women in arts, design, entertainment, sports and media, according to the…

FDA Moves to Restrict Flavored E-Cig Sales, Ban Menthol Cigarettes

THURSDAY, Nov. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Thursday it will take steps to limit or ban access to flavored e-cigarettes, menthol cigarettes and flavored cigars. The move against flavored e-cigarettes stops short of the full ban that had been expected from the agency. Instead, sales of these products…

Monkeys Can Carry Zika Virus, Scientists Discover

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Wild monkeys in South America carry the Zika virus, which can then be transmitted to people via mosquitoes, researchers report. The scientists said the finding suggests it may be impossible to eradicate the virus in the Americas. “Our findings are important because they change our understanding of the…

Low-Carb Diets May Work By Boosting Calorie Burn

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Strictly limiting carbohydrates and eating more fat may help the body burn more calories, a new clinical trial shows. Researchers found that among 164 adults in a weight-loss study, those placed on a low-carb, high-fat diet burned more daily calories, versus those given high-carb meals. On average, their…

Goodbye 'Gluten-Free'? Celiac Disease Vaccine May Make It Possible

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — People with celiac disease must follow a very restrictive diet, but an experimental vaccine may offer many of them the freedom to eat more normally. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder. If someone with the disease eats gluten — a protein found in wheat, barley and rye —…

You May Be Prediabetic and Don't Know It, CDC Warns

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — More than one-third of Americans have prediabetes, but 90 percent of them don’t know they have it, medical experts say. Prediabetes often leads to type 2 diabetes and other serious health problems, including heart disease and stroke. But research shows that people who know they have prediabetes are…

All That Social Media May Boost Loneliness, Not Banish It

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For the billions of young people who seek community and connection on social media, new research warns their search may be in vain. Instead, spending too much time on Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram may actually increase the risk of depression and loneliness. So concludes a small analysis that…

Teenage Obesity May Raise Pancreatic Cancer Risk Years Later

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Obesity in the teen years may increase the risk of developing deadly pancreatic cancer in adulthood, researchers report. The odds for this rare cancer can quadruple due to obesity, the Israeli research team found. Moreover, the risk rises as weight increases, even affecting men in the high normal…

Two Factors at Birth Can Boost a Child's Obesity Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Kids who were born large and whose mothers developed a form of diabetes during pregnancy have nearly triple the odds of becoming overweight or obese in childhood, new research shows. “Just like smoking, alcohol consumption and other lifestyle choices, [women’s] weight prior to getting pregnant, and weight gain…

Baby Boom or Baby Bust? What Nation-by-Nation Population Trends Reveal

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Birth rates are booming in 104 countries, but declining in 91 others, a new research reveals. The world’s population has risen 197 percent since 1950, from 2.6 billion to 7.6 billion in 2017. Between 2007 and 2017, it grew by 87.2 million people a year, compared with 81.5…

Exercise Makes Even the 'Still Overweight' Healthier: Study

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Heavyset folks who exercise regularly shouldn’t get discouraged if they can’t seem to shed more weight, no matter how hard they try. A new study suggests that their regular workouts are still contributing to better overall heart health, making them “fat but fit” and helping them live longer.…

Bypass Beats Stents for Diabetics With Heart Trouble: Study

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — People with both diabetes and multiple clogged heart arteries live longer if they undergo bypass surgery rather than have their blood vessels reopened with stents, according to follow-up results from a landmark clinical trial. Patients treated with coronary-artery bypass surgery survive about three years longer than those who…

5 Diet Foods That Are High in Fiber

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Dietary fiber is a unique component of many foods. It has no actual nutrients yet helps ward off a host of diseases and has even been associated with lower body weight. While women should aim for a minimum of 25 grams a day, and men 38 grams every…

U.S. OD Death Rate Worst Among Wealthier Nations

MONDAY, Nov. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — With the rate of drug overdose deaths more than doubling since the turn of the century, the United States now leads the world in these preventable tragedies. New research from investigators at the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) indicates that drug-related death rates in the United States are…

Concussion Tied to Suicide Risk

MONDAY, Nov. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — People who have experienced either a concussion or a mild traumatic brain injury are twice as likely to commit suicide than others, a new review suggests. The analysis also indicates that men and women who have had a concussion are also more likely to consider or attempt suicide.…

Could a Natural Protein Help Fight Obesity?

MONDAY, Nov. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — It’s a finding only observed so far in mice, but researchers say that a naturally occurring protein triggered significant weight loss in obese rodents. The scientists said the protein — FGFBP3 (BP3 for short) — might offer a new way to treat obesity as well as conditions associated…

Doctors Aren't Promoting Breastfeeding's Cancer-Protection Benefit

MONDAY, Nov. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Few American mothers learn from their health care providers that breastfeeding can reduce the risk of breast cancer, a new study finds. Researchers surveyed more than 700 mothers. Of the 92 percent who said they’d breastfed, 56 percent said they knew that breastfeeding reduced breast cancer risk before…

AHA: Heart Attacks More Common Now in Younger People, Especially Women

MONDAY, Nov. 12, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Heart attacks once characterized as a part of “old man’s disease” — are increasingly occurring in younger people, especially women, according to new research. The study, presented Sunday at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions meeting in Chicago and published in the AHA journal Circulation, sought to…

Even a 2-Minute Walk Counts in New Physical Activity Guidelines

MONDAY, Nov. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Take the stairs up to your office. Park a little further away from the grocery store. Walk your dog around the block. Carry out the trash. Any amount of physical activity — even two minutes’ worth — can add up to huge benefits for your immediate and long-term…

E-Alerts Dramatically Cut Heart Attack Rate for People Hospitalized With A-Fib

SUNDAY, Nov. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A simple pop-up alert on a computer screen could help save the brains and hearts of many hospital-bound people with an irregular heartbeat, a new clinical trial reveals. Rates for heart attack and stroke plunged by close to 90 percent in people helped by the new program, the…

Diabetes Drug Might Also Ease Heart Failure Risks

SATURDAY, Nov. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The diabetes drug Farxiga might do double-duty for patients, helping to ward off another killer, heart failure, new research shows. Type 2 diabetics who took Farxiga (dapagliflozin) saw their odds of hospitalization for heart failure drop by 27 percent compared to those who took a placebo, according to…

Fish, Fish Oil May Lower Your Heart Attack Risk

SATURDAY, Nov. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Eating more fish or taking a fish oil supplement can reduce your risk of a heart attack, according to a pair of Harvard-led clinical trials. Heart benefits from omega-3 fatty acids were found both in healthy people and in people with conditions that put them at increased risk…

New Cholesterol Guidelines Focus on Personalized Approach

SATURDAY, Nov. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A lifelong approach to lowering cholesterol, starting in some kids as young as 2, is the United States’ best bet to lower everyone’s risk of heart attack and stroke, according to updated guidelines released Saturday by the American Heart Association (AHA). “Personalized” cholesterol-fighting tactics recommended by the guidelines…

Mammograms Do Save Lives: Study

FRIDAY, Nov. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women confused by the conflicting advice surrounding the benefits and timing of mammograms will be interested in a new study out of Sweden. The research, involving more than 50,000 breast cancer patients, found that those who took part in a breast cancer screening program had a 60 percent…

AHA: Flu Season Can Send More Heart Failure Patients to Hospital

FRIDAY, Nov. 9, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Getting the flu may not only make you feel crummy, it also might land you in the hospital for heart problems. A team of researchers analyzed monthly flu reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in four communities across the United States between October 2010…

Nearly 1 in 10 Americans Struggles to Control Sexual Urges

FRIDAY, Nov. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The #MeToo movement has given many Americans a glimpse into an unfamiliar world that may have left many wondering, “What were they thinking?” It turns out they might not have been thinking much at all. New research suggests that almost 9 percent of people in the United States…

Aging Face, Uneven Features?

FRIDAY, Nov. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — If you think your face is a bit lopsided, just wait until you get older. New research shows that differences between the two sides of your face increase with age. For the study, scientists used 3-D digital imaging to scan the faces of 191 people, aged 4 months…

Another Weight Loss Tip: A Quick Fridge and Pantry Remodel

FRIDAY, Nov. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Eating healthier requires a mindset change. But it also helps to make changes in your home environment to encourage a new and better way of approaching food — starting in the kitchen. First, do a deep dive into your fridge. You want to rearrange shelves and drawers to…

Weight-Loss Surgery May Pay Off in the Bedroom, Too

THURSDAY, Nov. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Weight-loss surgery may have a side benefit that most don’t know about, with new research showing testosterone levels in male patients jump after the procedure is done. Obesity can lead to lower testosterone levels, lower sexual satisfaction and reduced fertility in men, the study authors explained. A man’s…

You Naturally Burn More Calories at Certain Time of Day: Study

THURSDAY, Nov. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) –When it comes to weight gain, what you eat clearly matters. But a small, preliminary study now suggests that when you eat also matters, with people burning off more calories at the end of the day than they do at the beginning. The finding is based on a three-week…

AHA: Traumatic Childhood Could Increase Heart Disease Risk in Adulthood

THURSDAY, Nov. 8, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Children who grow up in distressing or traumatic environments are more likely to have a heart attack or stroke by the time they reach middle age, according to a new study. While previous research has found links between adverse childhood experiences and cardiovascular disease risk factors in…

AHA: Age, Race Are Leading Predictors of Heart Attacks in Pregnant Women

THURSDAY, Nov. 8, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Heart attacks in pregnant women are rare, but the number is rising, particularly among older expectant mothers, according to a new study that looked at the most common factors behind the increase. The number of women who had heart attacks during or after pregnancy rose 19 percent…

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Hospital With Broken Ribs

THURSDAY, Nov. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) — After falling in her office on Wednesday evening, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was hospitalized with three broken ribs on Thursday morning. The 85-year-old first went home, but after experiencing discomfort overnight she was admitted to George Washington University Hospital on Thursday. Once there, doctors discovered…

Smoking, Diabetes May Be Especially Risky for Women's Hearts

THURSDAY, Nov. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Smoking, diabetes, high blood pressure: all bad for the heart, but perhaps worse for women’s hearts than men’s, new research shows. Looking at data on 472,000 Britons ages 40 to 69, researchers found that all three of these heart disease risk factors increased the odds of heart attack…

New Antibiotic Offers Hope Against 'Super Gonorrhea'

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Untreatable, antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea has become a chilling prospect in the United States, raising concerns that people might someday have to live with the sexually transmitted bacteria. But now there’s reason for hope. A newly developed antibiotic pill has proven effective against gonorrhea in early clinical trials. Zoliflodacin proved…

AHA: Poor Teeth-Brushing Habits Tied to Higher Heart Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 7, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Brushing your teeth twice a day for at least two minutes may lower the risk of cardiovascular diseases, a new study suggests. Previous studies have found a link between heart disease and periodontal disease — a condition marked by gum infection, gum inflammation and tooth damage. The…

Kratom Use in Pregnancy Spurs Withdrawal Symptoms in Newborns

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Although the herbal supplement kratom is still legal and widely available, its opioid-like effects have caused significant withdrawal symptoms in at least two newborns in the United States and that should raise concerns, researchers say. A case study of a baby boy exposed to kratom during his mother’s…

The Bigger the Brain, the Bigger the Tumor Risk?

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The bigger your brain, the greater your risk for a deadly brain cancer, new research from Norway suggests. It’s a matter of math: A large brain means more brain cells, and more cells means more cell divisions that can go wrong and cause mutations that trigger cancer, the…

High Blood Pressure in Young Adults Tied to Earlier Strokes

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Two new studies suggest that when people under 40 develop high blood pressure, their risk of early heart disease and stroke go up significantly. The first study found that in a group of about 5,000 young American adults, having high blood pressure was linked to as much as…

HPV Vaccination Rates Continue to Lag in U.S.

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — HPV vaccination rates are still too low to cut cervical cancer cases as much as is possible in the United States, a new report warns. While HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccination has increased in recent years, rates remain well below the federal government’s Healthy People 2020 goal of 80…

AHA: Stress May Raise Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Women

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Traditional risk factors like obesity, high blood pressure and a sedentary lifestyle may not be the only predictors of type 2 diabetes. New research points to the role that stress may play in the development of the condition in women. The study, being presented Nov. 10 at…

Early Birds May Have Lower Breast Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women who love the early hours of the day are less likely to develop breast cancer, a new study suggests. British researchers analyzed two data banks that included more than 409,000 women to investigate the link between sleep traits and breast cancer risk. Compared to night owls, women…

AHA: Postpartum Depression May Raise Heart Risks

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Otherwise healthy women diagnosed with postpartum depression may be at higher risk of a heart attack, stroke or heart failure, a new study suggests. Acting on mounting evidence linking clinical depression to cardiovascular disease, researchers sought to explore whether other forms of depression might also increase the…

Fewer Pregnant U.S. Women Smoke or Drink, But More Are Using Pot

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Over the past two decades, the percentage of U.S. women who say they’ve smoked or drank during a pregnancy has fallen, but the percentage who say they’ve used marijuana has nearly doubled, a new report finds. Between 2002 and 2016, the percentage of pregnant women ages 18 to…

Noisy Neighborhood? Your Heart May Pay a Price

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Living in noise-saturated neighborhoods might be more than simply annoying, with new research suggesting it seems to raise the risk for serious heart problems. Chronic noise from traffic and airports appears to trigger the amygdala, a brain region critically involved in stress regulation, brain scans have revealed. Noise…

Global Melanoma Deaths Up Among Men, But Not Women

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Melanoma skin cancer death rates in men are on the rise in most countries, but are stable or declining for women in some, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed World Health Organization data from 33 countries between 1985 and 2015. Melanoma death rates in men were increasing…

A Single Energy Drink Might Harm Blood Vessels: Study

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Caffeine-laden energy drinks are popular, but they might make your blood vessels less efficient, a small study suggests. These drinks — sold as Monster and Red Bull, to name two — have been linked to heart, nerve and stomach problems, researchers say. “A lot of young kids use…

Why Bystanders Are Less Likely to Give CPR to Women

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Some bystanders may avoid performing CPR on women because they fear hurting them, or even being accused of sexual assault, preliminary research suggests. In two new studies, researchers tried to dig deeper into a puzzling pattern that has been seen in past research: Women are less likely than…

If You're Considering Cosmetic Surgery…

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — More than 17 million cosmetic procedures are performed in the United States each year. Most of these are minimally invasive, designed to improve your appearance in subtle ways without the surgery, stitches and long healing time of early facelifts, once the only rejuvenating option available. Today’s most popular…

AHA: She Refuses to Let A Heart-Stopping Moment Slow Her

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Creating art and tackling do-it-yourself projects are soothing pastimes for many people, and 37-year-old Amy Cavaliere is one of them. The mother of three from Royersford, Pennsylvania — about a half hour from Philadelphia — enjoys making pallet wall art that combines hand-stenciled words and imagery on…

'Panic Parenting' Fear Drives Many Women to Freeze Eggs

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Trying to avoid “panic parenting” is the reason why many single women freeze their eggs for non-medical reasons, a small new study suggests. Panic parenting refers to having a relationship just to have a baby. “Whilst the number of women freezing their eggs remains small, many more are…

How Necessary Is HPV Cervical Cancer Screening for Women After Age 55?

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) has become the standard of care in screening for cervical cancer. But now, Canadian researchers say it may become unnecessary in women aged 55 or older who have one negative result with the test. The DNA-based HPV test is highly accurate in detecting…

Dad's Age May Play Role in Pregnancy Outcomes

THURSDAY, Nov. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — More men are delaying fatherhood, and new research suggests that might raise the risk of both birth complications and infant health problems. When new fathers are aged 45 or older, there’s an increased chance of preterm birth, infant seizures and even gestational diabetes in the mother, the study…

Half of Older Women Suffer Incontinence, Many Don't Tell Their Doc

THURSDAY, Nov. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Nearly half of older American women have urinary incontinence, but many have not talked to a doctor about it, a new national poll shows. More than 1,000 women, aged 50 to 80, were asked questions about their bladder control. The poll found that 43 percent of those in…

Less-Invasive Surgery for Cervical Cancer May Bring More Risks, Studies Find

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Surgeons have long turned to a minimally invasive means of hysterectomy when treating early stage cervical cancer. However, two new studies could change all that. Both found the approach was linked to a higher rate of cancer recurrence, plus worse long-term survival, compared to more “open” surgeries. “Minimally…

Take at Least a Year Between Pregnancies: Study

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women should wait a year or more between having babies, to reduce health risks to themselves and their infants, researchers report. “Our study found increased risks to both mother and infant when pregnancies are closely spaced, including for women older than 35,” said lead author Laura Schummers, a…

AHA: Can You Really Be Scared to Death?

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Every year around Oct. 31, as horror films, haunted houses and pranksters in creepy costumes try their best to give you a fright, the question arises: Can a person literally be scared to death? The answer is a very conditional “Yes.” But, experts say, it’s extraordinarily unlikely…

Autism Risk: Mom's Health May Matter More Than Meds

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Many pregnant women may wonder if antidepressants — or other drugs acting on the brain’s neurotransmitters — might raise their baby’s odds of developing autism. Now, reassuring research suggests that’s not the case. But a mother’s health before and during pregnancy may play a role in autism spectrum…

Tap Into the Health Powers of Garlic

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) — As scientists look more deeply into the effects of diet on health, they’re finding that more and more everyday foods offer benefits that go well beyond making dishes tastier. Garlic, an ingredient found in almost every type of cuisine, is emerging as one such superfood. Part of the…

Which Weight-Loss Surgery Is Best?

TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Deciding to have weight-loss surgery is tough enough, but then you have to choose between several procedures — each with different risks and potential weight loss. So how do you decide which one is best for you? New research that compares three types of weight-loss surgery in more…

The Real Reasons Parents Refuse HPV Vaccination

TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Safety concerns are a main reason American parents hesitate to have their children vaccinated against the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), according to a new study. The finding challenges a common reason given by doctors for not recommending the vaccine more forcefully — that parents are concerned the…

Common Chemical Tied to Language Delay in Kids

MONDAY, Oct. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Children may suffer delayed language skills if their mothers come in contact with common chemicals called phthalates in early pregnancy, new research suggests. Phthalates are in countless products from nail polish and hair spray to food packaging and vinyl flooring. As plasticizers, they make things more pliable; as…

An Action Plan When You Regain That Lost Weight

MONDAY, Oct. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) — It’s the most frustrating part of dieting: Regaining the weight you worked so hard to lose. It helps to understand why this happens so you won’t blame yourself as you get back on track. Many hormones that regulate body weight and rule your appetite seem to go haywire…

Vaginal Ring That Targets Pregnancy, HIV Seems Safe: Study

FRIDAY, Oct. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — An experimental vaginal ring meant to prevent pregnancy and HIV looks safe, according to an early stage study. The dual-purpose ring releases the antiretroviral drug dapivirine and the contraceptive hormone levonorgestrel, said researchers led by Dr. Sharon Achilles, of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. “We are…

Obese Patients Often Denied Kidney Transplants. Should They Be?

FRIDAY, Oct. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Obese patients in need of a kidney transplant may find themselves denied one because of their weight, but a new study says that shouldn’t happen in all cases. Researchers have found that kidneys given to obese patients fared as well as those transplanted into normal-weight patients. In addition,…

Family Leave Boosts Breastfeeding Rates, But Mostly for Affluent Moms

FRIDAY, Oct. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Paid leave for new mothers may increase breastfeeding rates, but mainly among women with higher incomes, a new study contends. The United States is the only developed country that does not offer paid leave to new parents on a national level. But four states now offer paid leave,…

Flu Activity Is Low — For Now

THURSDAY, Oct. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Although this flu season is off to a slow start, U.S. health officials are urging everyone to get vaccinated now. Why? Last year was one of the worst flu seasons on record, yet fewer Americans got a flu shot than in years past. In fact, less than four…

Need Your Botox Working Faster? Make a Face

THURSDAY, Oct. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Have a big social event tomorrow night and need “emergency Botox”? A new study finds that if you get the wrinkle-relaxing shots today, you can speed up the effect by making faces. Simple facial exercises can speed the wrinkle-smoothing effects of botulinum toxin (Botox), according to researchers from…

Does Stroke Run in Your Family? Healthy Living Lowers the Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Has stroke hit your family particularly hard? A healthy lifestyle may be your best defense, new research shows. The study of more than 306,000 white British people found that exercising, eating right and not smoking lowered stroke risk — even for those whose DNA predisposed them to the…

Cold, Windy Days Can Strain the Heart

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Brisk autumn winds and chilly winter temperatures may make you more vulnerable to heart trouble, a new study suggests. Researchers found “an increase in heart attacks in low temperature, strong wind, low sunshine duration and low atmospheric pressure,” said senior author Dr. David Erlinge, head of cardiology at…

AHA: Music Helped This Young Stroke Survivor Stay Strong

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Toni Hickman and her boyfriend were visiting New Orleans in 2007 to celebrate a hip-hop music project she was wrapping up. The singer, poet and songwriter had already achieved some success singing and rapping her own tunes at clubs and had recorded in studios for music labels.…

Medical Bills 'Toxic' for Some Breast Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Many women living with advanced breast cancer face significant financial strains — from paying for their care to simply covering monthly bills, a new survey finds. Researchers found that of the more than 1,000 women they surveyed, nearly 70 percent said they were worried about the financial fallout…

Brisk Walks May Help, Not Harm, Arthritic Knees

TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) — If you suffer from knee arthritis and worry that walking will only worsen your damaged joint, a new study suggests you put your fears aside, slip on some sneakers, and take a brief but brisk walk. The researchers estimated that if older adults with the condition added just…

Warmer Weather Gets Seniors Outdoors and Moving

TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The better the weather, the more seniors venture out and get active. So say researchers who assessed the activity levels of more than 1,200 adults in Norway, aged 70 to 77, who were grouped based on whether they scored low, medium or high on a fitness test. “Older…

Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor Has Dementia

TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor — the first woman on the high court — has dementia, “probably Alzheimer’s disease,” she announced Tuesday. Doctors diagnosed her with the beginning stages of dementia “some time ago,” O’Connor, 88, said in a letter addressed to “friends and fellow…

AHA: Heart Health's Impact on Brain May Begin in Childhood

TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 (American Heart Association) — A child’s blood pressure could indicate cognition problems into adulthood, according to a new study suggesting the cardiovascular connection to cognitive decline could begin much earlier in life than previously believed. The findings may provide a window into the roots of dementia, for which high blood pressure…

You Probably Have 'Microplastics' in Your Poop: Study

TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) — There’s a good chance a dose of tiny plastic particles has taken up residence in your gut, a new, small study argues. Microplastics, as they are called, were found in stool samples from a handful of volunteers located across Europe and Asia, researchers report. Every single person out…

1 in 4 College Students Really Stressed Out by 2016 Election: Survey

MONDAY, Oct. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For some college students in the United States, the 2016 presidential election triggered significant distress symptoms, a new survey suggests. Nearly 800 students were surveyed at one university. One-quarter suffered distress levels similar to what’s seen among witnesses to a mass shooting, researchers said. Such stress can interfere…

Pregnancy Complications Down for Women With Lupus

MONDAY, Oct. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Deaths and complications among pregnant women with lupus have declined in the United States over the past two decades, a new study finds. Lupus, also called systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), is a chronic autoimmune disease that causes inflammation in many parts of the body, including the kidneys, skin…

Stroke After Heart Attack: Danger May Persist for Months

MONDAY, Oct. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) — After a heart attack, your risk for a stroke is elevated longer than previously believed, preliminary results of a new study suggest. “A heart attack is a risk factor for stroke for at least three months,” said researcher Dr. Alexander Merkler, an assistant professor of neurology at Weill…

Almost Half of Americans Are Trying to Lose Weight: CDC

FRIDAY, Oct. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The latest national tally on dieting finds that nearly half of U.S. adults are doing what they can to trim a widening waistline. Overall, 49.3 percent of people aged 20 and older said they’d tried to lose weight over the past 12 months, according to the U.S. Centers…

Hormonal Changes Might Lead to Hernias in Aging Men, Mouse Study Suggests

FRIDAY, Oct. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Age-related increases in estrogen may be the reason why inguinal hernias are common among older men, new research with rodents suggests. Inguinal hernias occur when soft tissue — often part of the intestines — protrudes through a weak spot in the abdominal wall near the groin. These hernias…

Brain's 'Self-Control' Center May Be Key to Weight-Loss Success

THURSDAY, Oct. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A behavioral therapist could be as important as a calorie-cutting diet for folks who want to lose weight, researchers say. Brain scans reveal that people who are better at losing weight have more activity in regions of the brain associated with self-control, a small new study reports. Teaching…

Omega-3s in Seafood May Keep You Healthier, Longer

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Tuna, salmon, mackerel, cod: Whatever your preference, eating more seafood may help you stay healthy as you age, new research suggests. In a study spanning 22 years, researchers found that higher blood levels of the omega-3 fatty acids found in seafood were associated with a better chance of…

Preeclampsia Tied to Tripling of Dementia in Later Life

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — High blood pressure during pregnancy can be a sign of preeclampsia — a potentially life-threatening complication. Now, new research suggests preeclampsia might also make women more vulnerable to a specific type of dementia. Women with a history of preeclampsia were 3.4 times more likely to suffer from vascular…

Don't Want Rosacea? Drinking Coffee Might Help

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Contrary to popular belief, new research suggests that drinking coffee might be a good prescription for avoiding the unsightly skin condition known as rosacea. The finding is based on an analysis of rosacea risk and dietary habits among nearly 83,000 women who were enrolled in a national nurses’…

AHA: No Direct Link Between Preeclampsia and Cognitive Impairment, Study Finds

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17, 2018 (American Heart Association) — While preeclampsia puts women at greater risk for stroke and high blood pressure following childbirth, a new study found that the pregnancy-related condition may not predispose them to significant cognitive impairment later in life. Instead, other physical and social risk factors related to the condition may be…

Pounds Regained After Weight-Loss Op Can Tell Your Doc a Lot

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Tracking pounds regained after weight-loss surgery can help predict a patient’s risk for serious health problems like diabetes, a new study says. “Clinicians and patients want to know the extent of weight regain following bariatric surgery and how it may affect their health,” said study lead author Wendy…

U.S. Birth Rates Continue to Drop as Age of New Moms Rises

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — American women are having fewer children, and they’re having them later in life, a new government report shows. “Overall, we saw continuing decreasing trends in total fertility,” said report author Danielle Ely, a health statistician at the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), which is part of the…

N. Carolina Sees Alarming Spike in Heart Infections Among Opioid Users

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Adding to growing alarm about America’s opioid crisis, cases of a potentially deadly heart infection have jumped 10-fold among North Carolina’s injection drug users, new research shows. The infection is endocarditis, which strikes one or more of the heart’s four valves. Usually a byproduct of aging, it can…

Bigger Family, Lower Cancer Risk?

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — If you come from a large family, you may have a lower risk of cancer, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed data from 178 countries and found that people from larger families were less likely to get cancer than those from smaller families. The link between family size…

AHA: After 2 Breast Cancer Diagnoses, Survivor Learns She Needs a New Heart

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (American Heart Association) — The hair loss, fatigue and nausea were a given. As a nurse, Toni C. Wild had seen patients faced with these common side effects of chemotherapy. What Wild did not expect when she was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 29 is that the chemotherapy drugs she…

Obesity Surgery May Cut Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Obesity surgery may help prevent heart attacks and strokes in people who are severely overweight and have diabetes, a new large study suggests. It’s already known that obesity surgery can help people shed pounds and better control health conditions like diabetes and high blood pressure. But it has…

5 Strength-Training Mistakes to Avoid

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Developing lean muscle mass is important for everyone — it can keep you active and independent throughout your life. But to maximize the benefits of strength training, make sure you’re not making these common mistakes. Mistake number 1: Letting momentum drive your workout. If you power through repetitions…

Countries That Ban Spanking See Less Teen Violence: Study

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Nations that officially frown upon hitting kids as a form of punishment appear to have teens who are less prone to violence, new research suggests. In countries that have a complete ban on corporal punishment (spanking and slapping), the rates of physical fighting among teens are as much…

Push-Button Pain Meds Curb Need for Opioids After C-Section: Study

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Letting women who’ve had a cesarean section dispense and control pain medication through a catheter reduces their use of addictive oral opioid painkillers, researchers report. Their study included 576 women who had planned C-sections. In such cases, it’s common to inject a local anesthetic and a small dose…

Diabetes Can Make Weight-Loss Harder. Here's Help

SUNDAY, Oct. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Because of the medications they take, losing weight can be difficult for people with diabetes. Diabetes medications are a major roadblock to weight loss, according to a paper from the American Association of Diabetes Educators. “Diabetes medications are vital in helping manage blood sugar, so you shouldn’t stop…

AHA: A Child's Eyes May Be a Window Into Later Heart Disease Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 12, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Having optimal cardiovascular health as a child could predict the health of tiny blood vessels in the eye in adulthood — a finding that could serve as an early marker of heart disease, according to new research. The study, published Friday in the Journal of the American…

Do Dimmer Days in Pregnancy Raise Postpartum Depression Risk?

FRIDAY, Oct. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women whose final stages of pregnancy occur during the short, dark days of winter may be at increased risk for postpartum depression, a new study suggests. It has to do with reduced exposure to sunlight — the same culprit that contributes to seasonal affective disorder, or SAD. That’s…

C-Section Rates Have Nearly Doubled Since 2000: Study

FRIDAY, Oct. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The number of women delivering babies via cesarean section has nearly doubled worldwide since 2000, to about 21 percent, new research shows. That’s significantly higher than the 10 percent to 15 percent considered medically necessary, researchers said. When complications develop, C-sections can save the lives of mothers and…

Does Breastfeeding Hormone Protect Against Type 2 Diabetes?

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The hormone prolactin — most commonly associated with breastfeeding — may play a role in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. Researchers found that women with the highest levels of the hormone, though still in the normal range, had a 27 percent reduced…

Genes, Not Diet, May Be Key to Gout Flare-Ups

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Although many people suffering from painful gout flare-ups point to diet as the culprit, new research suggests DNA plays a much bigger role. The findings challenge the long-held belief that diet is the major factor in gout, a joint disease that causes extreme pain and swelling. Gout is…

Flu Shot in Pregnancy Lowers Risk of Flu Hospitalization

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The flu shot reduces a pregnant woman’s risk of hospitalization for flu by 40 percent, new research shows. “Expecting mothers face a number of threats to their health and the health of their baby during pregnancy, and getting the flu is one of them,” said study co-author Allison…

Could Same-Sex Couples Have Babies With Shared DNA? Study Hints It's Possible

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Lesbian and gay couples might one day be able to produce offspring that share genetic traits from both parents, a study in mice has determined. Researchers with the Chinese Academy of Sciences produced 29 healthy mouse pups from two mothers using stem cells and targeted gene editing, according…

Obesity Doubles Odds for Colon Cancer in Younger Women

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — While rates of colon cancer have declined among people 50 and older, they’re on the rise for younger Americans. Now, new research suggests widening waistlines may be one reason why. In the study, women aged 20 to 49 who were overweight or obese had up to twice the…

Major Childbirth Complications More Likely for Black Women

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Black women have the highest risk of life-threatening birth complications in the United States, a new study finds. Compared to whites, black women had a 70 percent higher rate of major birth problems, the University of Michigan researchers reported. “Celebrities like Serena Williams who have shared their birth-related…

Weight-Loss Surgery Linked to Fewer Delivery Complications

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Obesity makes pregnancy complications more likely. But new research suggests that women who’ve undergone weight-loss surgery might have a safer delivery. “We know that obesity and overweight are dangerous in connection with childbirth,” said study author Dr. Olof Stephansson, of Karolinska Institute in Solna, Sweden. Weight-loss [bariatric] surgery…

AHA: The Study and Town That Changed the Health of a Generation

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10, 2018 (American Heart Association) — It’s been 70 years since a small, middle-class community 23 miles west of Boston became the linchpin in helping to solve the mysteries of heart disease. Smoking. Cholesterol. Blood pressure. Obesity. It’s common knowledge today that these all can lead to heart trouble. But in the 1940s,…

AHA: Some Gut Germs May Help Recovery After Heart Attack

TUESDAY, Oct. 9, 2018 (American Heart Association) — The tiny microbes located inside the intestines could play a critical role in heart attack recovery, according to a new study that found gut bacteria helpful in repairing the damage after a heart attack. But the study was conducted in laboratory mice and scientists say far more…

Type 1 Diabetes Often Misdiagnosed in Adults

TUESDAY, Oct. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — It’s not always easy — even for doctors — to tell if someone has type 1 or type 2 diabetes when they’re diagnosed as an adult. And a new study finds mistakes are common. That’s what happened to British Prime Minister Theresa May when she was diagnosed with…

Early Pushing in Childbirth Won't Hurt Mom or Baby, Study Finds

TUESDAY, Oct. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Expectant moms will want to read this. Pushing sooner during childbirth is just as safe for most women and babies as pushing later, researchers report. The best time to start pushing during labor has been a matter of debate. Many U.S. hospitals recommend delaying pushing, but evidence has…

Lose Excess Pounds, Lower Breast Cancer Risk?

TUESDAY, Oct. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Dropping weight might do more than make an older woman feel good. New research suggests it could lower her odds of breast cancer. The study included over 61,000 postmenopausal women with no prior breast cancer and normal mammogram results. Their weight was checked at the start of the…

Weight-Loss Surgery May Raise Gallstone Risk: Study

TUESDAY, Oct. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The quick weight loss that occurs after bariatric surgery seems to have an unintended consequence — a greater risk of gallstones, a new study suggests. The rapid loss of pounds was linked to a 10-fold increase in the hospital admissions for pancreatitis, gallstones and other gallbladder conditions. “Gallstones…

Four Myths About Breast Cancer Debunked

TUESDAY, Oct. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — There are four common myths about breast cancer that can affect prevention and treatment of the most common type of cancer in American women, an oncologist says. The first is believing you’re not at risk because no one in your family has cancer. “Less than 10 percent of…

Tips for Enhancing the Spa Experience

MONDAY, Oct. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) — While a weekend (or longer) retreat can be very rejuvenating, day spas have made it possible for almost everyone to enjoy a short escape from life’s stresses. Take these simple steps to make the most of the experience. Identify all the day spas within a comfortable driving distance…

Breast Cancer Screening Just May Save Your Life

SUNDAY, Oct. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Breast cancer screening is the most reliable way to detect the disease when it’s at an early stage and is most treatable, experts advise. “Today, there is greater awareness of the disease, and breast cancer is being detected earlier through screening,” said Dr. Kathryn Evers, senior radiologist and…

Half of Antibiotics Given Without Infection Diagnosis

FRIDAY, Oct. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — After years of public health warnings about antibiotic misuse, a new study suggests the problem is far from being solved. Researchers found that of more than 500,000 antibiotic prescriptions they analyzed, nearly half were written without an infection-related diagnosis. And about 20 percent were given without an office…

'Broken Heart Syndrome' Warrants Careful Monitoring

FRIDAY, Oct. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — It’s not a heart attack, but so-called “broken heart syndrome” still puts patients at high risk for hospital readmission and in-hospital death, a new study suggests. Broken heart syndrome — also called Takotsubo syndrome — causes symptoms similar to a heart attack, including chest pain and difficulty breathing.…

Does Aspirin Help Prevent Liver Cancer?

FRIDAY, Oct. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Take two aspirins and reduce your risk of liver cancer? New research suggests this weekly routine might help. The researchers found that taking two or more standard-dose (325 milligram) pills a week was associated with a 49 percent lower risk of liver cancer. “Regular use of aspirin led…

Vitamin D Supplements Won't Build Bone Health in Older Adults: Study

THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Vitamin D supplements have long been touted as a way to improve bone health and possibly ward off the bone-thinning disease osteoporosis in older adults. But a new study contends that claims of benefits from supplements of the “sunshine vitamin” fall flat. A review of previously published studies…

Low-Dose Aspirin May Protect Against Ovarian Cancer: Study

THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Regular use of low-dose aspirin may the reduce risk of ovarian cancer, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed data from more than 205,000 American women and found that those who reported recent, regular use of low-dose aspirin (defined as 100 milligrams or less) had a 23 percent lower…

Alzheimer's Gene Tied to 'Chemo Brain' in Breast Cancer Survivors

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Many older breast cancer patients might worry that they will be struck by “chemo brain” after their treatments, but a new study suggests that only those who carry a gene linked to Alzheimer’s face that risk. Researchers found that breast cancer survivors carrying the APOE4 gene who underwent…

How Much He Sleeps May Affect His Stroke Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Getting too little or too much sleep can affect stroke risk, depending on a man’s race, researchers say. “These results suggest that short and long sleep duration may have different consequences for people depending on race and sex,” said study author Virginia Howard, from the University of Alabama…

AHA: Doctors Could Do More to Help Smokers With Poor Circulation

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Doctors are not doing nearly enough to help peripheral artery disease patients quit smoking, a key risk factor for the disease, a new study shows. The study, published Oct. 3 in the Journal of the American Heart Association, took a close look at the relationship between smoking…

Science Says 'Hug It Out'

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Hugs. Everyone knows they feel good, but new research shows they really can take the edge off of interpersonal conflicts. Assessing more than 400 adults, scientists found that getting a hug on the day of a conflict was linked to smaller drops in positive emotions and a smaller…

Acne's Stigma Can Take a Big Mental Toll

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The impact of acne is more than skin-deep, and often disrupts sleep and well-being, scientists have found. Researchers in Ireland report that perceived social stigma diminishes quality of life for many who have acne — especially girls and women. “We know from previous research that many acne sufferers…

AHA: After 2 Heart Attacks, She May Need a New Heart — But First Comes Her Wedding

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (American Heart Association) — On her way to watch her beloved Kansas City Chiefs play in 2016, Leah Huss felt sensations far different from the usual pre-game jitters. There was shortness of breath. And a heaviness in the left side of her chest. Worse yet, those feelings were awfully familiar. Seven…

Could Diet Affect Breast Cancer Risk?

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Like the human gut, the breast gland has a “microbiome” that’s influenced by diet, new animal research suggests. Although the findings are preliminary, scientists hope their work might someday improve the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. “Being able to shift the breast microbiome through diet may offer…

Sexual Assault Has Long-Term Mental, Physical Impact

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Decades-old allegations of sexual assault have consumed the nation for the past two weeks, as the Senate, the FBI and the public wrestle with what it all may mean for both the U.S. Supreme Court and American society at large in the age of #MeToo. The high-stakes debate…

Pregnancy Complications Tied to More Menopausal Hot Flashes

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Tough pregnancies might translate into tough times during menopause, new research suggests. Women who developed complications during pregnancy — including dangerously high blood pressure (“preeclampsia”) and gestational diabetes — were more likely to experience more hot flashes during menopause, the researchers found. “This study further underscores the importance…

What Did Americans Eat Today? A Third Would Say Fast Food

TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Americans’ love affair with fast food continues, with 1 in every 3 adults chowing down on the fare on any given day. That’s the finding from a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. When asked by researchers, 37 percent of adults said they’d…

'Southern' Diet Blamed for Black Americans' Health Woes

TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Black Americans are at greater risk of high blood pressure than whites, and a new study suggests the “Southern” diet bears much of the blame. Experts have long known that blacks are more likely to die of heart disease and stroke than whites — and that rates of…

Sleepy Teens More Prone to Drug Use, Suicide Attempts

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — High school students who get too little sleep are more likely than others to use drugs, drink alcohol or attempt suicide, U.S. researchers warn. And while teenagers need eight to 10 hours of sleep nightly, only 30 percent of students report getting that amount, according to survey data…

Drinking Enough Water Could Be Key to Avoiding UTIs

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women plagued by recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) may look no farther than their kitchen tap for relief, a new study suggests. Researchers found that women who drank plenty of water had a significant reduction in their odds for a recurrence of the common infections. “This study provides…

'Yo-Yo' Cardio Readings May Signal Heart Risks

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — If your weight, blood pressure, cholesterol or blood sugar levels fluctuate, you may have a higher risk of heart attack, stroke and premature death than people with more steady readings, new research suggests. According to the study, during nearly six years of follow-up, men and women whose readings…

Patients Want Breast Cancer Costs Upfront

FRIDAY, Sept. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The cost of breast cancer treatment rarely comes up in doctor-patient discussions — but most patients wish it would, researchers report. “Doctors and patients should be open to discussing the financial implications of treatment,” said study author Dr. Rachel Greenup, of the Duke Cancer Institute in Durham, N.C.…

AHA: Is Coffee Good for You?

FRIDAY, Sept. 28, 2018 (American Heart Association) — At just a couple of calories a cup, good old black coffee packs quite a punch. It wakes you up, boosts your metabolic rate and decreases the risk of some diseases. Not that habitual coffee drinkers need convincing, but evidence of its health benefits stacks up quickly:…

Parents Teach Firstborns About Sex, But Not Their Later Kids

FRIDAY, Sept. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Younger siblings are less likely than firstborns to hear about the birds and the bees from their parents, a new study suggests. Instead, they may learn what’s what from their older brothers and sisters, British researchers report. “Although there has been much research into how the order in…

Diet Tips That Go Beyond Calorie Cutting

FRIDAY, Sept. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Calories in must be less than calories out — that’s the basic rule of dieting. But there’s more to losing weight because more than hunger often motivates people to eat. So how can you find effective motivation to change your eating habits and lose weight? Try these five…

AHA: New Report Explores Genes Behind Congenital Heart Disease

THURSDAY, Sept. 27, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Genetics are at the core of some congenital heart defects, and a just-released scientific statement could help guide doctors in new information and testing techniques that not only could help patients but also their families. The report from the American Heart Association, published Sept. 27 in the…

With 80,000 Flu Deaths Last Season, Experts Urge Vaccination

THURSDAY, Sept. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Influenza killed an estimated 80,000 Americans during last winter’s flu season, making it the deadliest season in more than four decades, U.S. health officials reported Thursday. A particularly virulent flu strain, H3N2, rampaged across the United States during the 2017-2018 season, causing a record number of deaths and…

Newer Birth Control Pills Tied to Lower Odds for Ovarian Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (HealthDay — News) — There’s long been a connection between birth control pills and a reduced risk of ovarian cancer. Now, new research suggests that’s true for the latest form of the drug, as well. Scientists say the protective effect of the newer pills — which contain lower doses of estrogens…

Rat Poison in Synthetic Pot Can Kill Users: Report

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Synthetic marijuana laced with rat poison has caused hundreds of hospitalizations in the United States this year, and a new study details just how serious the poisonings can be. In July, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned of recent outbreaks of severe bleeding linked to synthetic marijuana…

Women Who Breastfeed Longer More Likely to Have More Kids

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Moms who breastfeed their first child for at least five months are likely to have more kids than women who stop sooner or bottle-feed, a new study suggests. The finding comes from an analysis of data on nearly 3,700 mothers collected between 1979 and 2012. Cornell University researchers…

AHA: Years After Pregnancy, Heart Risks Track From Mother to Child

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (American Heart Association) — A mother can pass down a lot of physical traits to her child, such as her smile, eye color, or the shape of her nose. According to new research, she may also be passing along something not as obvious — a vulnerability for developing heart disease. A…

Breast Cancer Treatment Adherence Rates Vary by Race

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Black women are more likely than white women to skip important hormonal breast cancer treatments, new research indicates. Endocrine therapy is used to add, block or get rid of naturally occurring hormones like estrogen and progesterone that trigger certain types of breast cancer, the study authors explained. Previous…

AHA: Bystander CPR Rates Rising, But Survival Chances Worse for Women

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (American Heart Association) — More people are stepping in to help give CPR when someone’s heart stops, and first responders are intervening at higher levels — but survival rates are higher for men who have cardiac arrests than for women, a recent study suggests. Based on data for 8,100 people in…

AHA: Missouri Woman Puts Health First After AFib Diagnosis

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Alice Hinrichs woke up feeling miserable. She was exhausted, nauseated and her left arm hurt. She thought she was sick, so she called her doctor’s office for an appointment. Instead, her doctor urged her to go to a hospital in case her symptoms were warnings for a…

Number of Infants Born With Syphilis Reaches 20-Year High: CDC

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The number of newborns suffering from syphilis has nearly tripled in recent years, U.S. health officials reported Tuesday. Cases jumped from 362 in 2013 to 918 in 2017 — the highest number in 20 years. Cases were seen in 37 states, mostly in the West and South. “We’ve…

Overweight in Pregnancy? Here's How to Keep Excess Pounds at Bay

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Heather Kinion never spent much time thinking about her weight. But when she got pregnant, that changed. “My sister had a baby a few years before me and had gained a bunch of weight, and she still hadn’t lost it when I got pregnant,” Kinion said. So the…

Short Bout of Exercise Might Boost Your Memory

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Just a little bit of light exercise can immediately improve a person’s memory, new Japanese research suggests. How little? The small study involved 36 healthy college-aged men and women and found that just 10 minutes of relaxed cycling on a stationary bike was all it took to improve…

Shorter People May Duck Risk of Varicose Veins

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — How tall you are might play a part in whether you are unlucky enough to develop varicose veins, a new study suggests. Every additional 4 inches in height increases your risk of varicose veins by about 25 percent, said researcher Dr. Erik Ingelsson, a professor of cardiovascular medicine…

If Mom Smokes Pot, Kids May Try It Sooner

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — If Mom partakes of pot, her kids may be more likely to try it themselves at an earlier age. That’s the contention of a new study, though it doesn’t prove that one causes the other. Still, “early initiation is one of the strongest predictors of the likelihood of…

Milk Straight From Breast Best for Baby's Weight

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Breast milk from the bottle may not have as many benefits for a baby’s weight as feeding straight from the breast, a new study suggests. The researchers found what many others have: Overall, breastfed babies tended to have a healthier weight than those who were formula-fed. However, babies…

Fewer American Teens Having Sex, Most Using Birth Control

FRIDAY, Sept. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) — In a finding that should ease parents’ minds, new research shows that fewer American teens are having sex and most of those who do are using some form of birth control. But scientists also found that sexual violence has become more common among high school students and condom…

AHA: Inequities Remain in Heart Attack Treatments for Black Patients

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Black patients hospitalized for heart attacks continue to receive different medical treatment than white patients, according to a new study that explored whether previously reported racial differences in care have faded. Researchers found that black heart attack patients were less likely than white patients to undergo aggressive…

Mediterranean Diet May Cut Stroke Risk for Women, But Not Men

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The Mediterranean diet may do more than help you reach and maintain a healthy weight: New research suggests that women who follow it also lower their stroke risk. But men did not reap the same benefit from the diet, which concentrates on fish, fruits, nuts, vegetables and beans,…

Opioid Crisis Driving Decline in U.S. Life Expectancy: CDC

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Life expectancy in the United States has declined for two years in a row, fueled by increasing death rates from opioid drug overdoses, suicides and chronic liver disease, a new government report shows. “It’s really the first time we’ve seen this multi-year drop” in decades, said Renee Gindi,…

Boys Lag Behind Girls in Reading by 4th Grade

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — By fourth grade, girls in the United States read and write better than boys, a new study reveals. Australian researchers found this gender achievement gap appears in standardized tests and worsens over time. “The common thinking is that boys and girls in grade school start with the same…

Mom-to-Be's High-Gluten Diet Linked to Type 1 Diabetes in Baby

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — If a pregnant woman eats a lot of high-gluten foods, the odds that her child will have type 1 diabetes rise significantly, new research suggests. In the study, pregnant women who had the highest consumption of gluten had double the risk of having a child with type 1…

1 in 6 Americans Over 40 Has Been Knocked Unconscious: Study

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Brain injury research typically focuses on football players and military veterans, but a new study suggests head injuries are far more widespread than estimated. About 1 in every 6 U.S. adults — roughly 23 million people aged 40 or older — have been knocked out by a head…

Ovary Removal Linked to Kidney Disease

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women who have their ovaries removed before menopause may find themselves at higher risk for chronic kidney disease, a new study suggests. Researchers believe the reason behind it is the drop in estrogen levels that follows the procedure. “This is the first study that has shown an important…

5 Facts Every Woman Should Know About Ovarian Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The early symptoms of ovarian cancer are often confused with less serious issues, making successful treatment less likely, a cancer expert warns. Ovarian cancer is called a “silent killer.” That’s because many women are diagnosed too late, said Dr. David Fishman of NewYork-Presbyterian Queens Hospital in New York…

Dozens of Medical Groups Join Forces to Improve Diagnoses

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Every nine minutes, a patient in a U.S. hospital dies because a diagnosis was wrong or delayed — resulting in 80,000 deaths a year. That sobering estimate comes from the Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine (SIDM). To help remedy this situation, more than 40 health care and…

30 Million Americans Now Have Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — 1 in 7 Americans has diabetes, and many don’t even know they have the blood sugar disease, a new report shows. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 14 percent of U.S adults have diabetes — 10 percent know it and more than 4 percent…

As More U.S. Women Delay Childbirth, Multiple Births May Rise

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — More American women than ever are having twins, triplets, quadruplets and even quintuplets, and it’s not just because some are using fertility treatments, new research shows. Since the 1980s, the number of multiple births has jumped from roughly 20 sets per 1,000 live births to almost 35 sets…

Acupuncture: A New Look at an Ancient Remedy

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Widely practiced in Asia for thousands of years, acupuncture is one of the key components of traditional Chinese medicine. Yet it’s still viewed with some skepticism in the Western world. And for the squeamish, just the idea of needles can be a turnoff. But, depending on what ails…

Could the Zika Virus Fight the Brain Cancer That Killed John McCain?

TUESDAY, Sept. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Preliminary research in mice suggests that the Zika virus might be turned from foe into friend — enlisted to curb deadly glioblastoma brain tumors. A glioblastoma is among the most lethal of brain cancers, killing more than 15,000 Americans each year. U.S. Senators John McCain and Ted Kennedy…

Scientists Find 500 More Genes That Influence Blood Pressure

TUESDAY, Sept. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) — In what is being billed as the largest genetic study ever conducted, British scientists report they have spotted more than 500 genes that play a role in blood pressure. The research, which involved more than 1 million people, expands the understanding of the genetic factors that determine blood…

AHA: Common Treatment for AFib May Also Lower Anxiety, Depression

TUESDAY, Sept. 18, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Levels of anxiety and depression seen in people who have a common heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation may be affected by how the heart condition is treated, a new study suggests. Past studies have shown that anxiety, distress and depression are common among people with AFib.…

AHA: Heart Health Pays Dividends for Businessman Who Survived Cardiac Arrest

TUESDAY, Sept. 18, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Will Treinen has never been one to sit on the sidelines. The 51-year-old entrepreneur sacrificed many nights and weekends building a successful consulting company in Olympia, Washington. When he’s off the clock, Will and his wife, Denise, enjoy spending time with their two grown daughters and two…

Injected Drug May Be New Weapon Against Gout

TUESDAY, Sept. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A new approach to preventing gout attacks looks promising for people not already helped by existing treatments. Researchers are looking at an anti-inflammatory drug called canakinumab (Ilaris) to treat this painful form of arthritis. Instead of targeting excessively high uric acid levels as existing gout drugs do, the…

Many Americans Slicing Meat From Their Diet

MONDAY, Sept. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Is America’s love affair with meat starting to lose its luster? A new survey finds that many Americans are cutting back on the amount of red and processed meat they eat — and even some poultry and fish — because they’re worried about their health or their finances.…

Air Pollutants Reach Placenta, Might Harm Fetus: Study

MONDAY, Sept. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Scientists warn that soot from polluted air is reaching the placenta of pregnant women, possibly harming the health of unborn babies. Tiny carbon particles released by the burning of fossil fuels enter a woman’s bloodstream when she breathes polluted air, said a research team at Queen Mary University…

Scent of a Woman: Fertile Females Smell Better to Men

MONDAY, Sept. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — New research suggests there is no perfume a man loves more than the scent of a fertile woman. Researchers in Switzerland determined that women who are the “fittest” for reproduction have a distinctive scent that makes them particularly appealing to men. “Women with high estrogen and low progesterone…

Look for Early Signs of Thyroid Cancer, Experts Urge

SATURDAY, Sept. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Cases of thyroid cancer are on the rise in the United States, and experts want you to know how people at high risk for the disease can detect it early. According to the American Cancer Society, 54,000 new cases will be diagnosed in the United States in 2018.…

Mumps Spread Quickly at Texas Cheerleading Meets: Study

FRIDAY, Sept. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Mumps is a highly infectious disease, as Texas cheerleaders and their supporters found out in one recent outbreak. Researchers looked over data on a mumps outbreak that began in December 2016 among those attending three cheerleading events in North Texas. “In all, 12 mumps cases (five confirmed and…

1 in 12 Americans Lives With Debilitating Chronic Pain

FRIDAY, Sept. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Of the 50 million Americans living with chronic pain, the pain is so bad for 20 million that it keeps them from doing the daily activities of life, researchers say. According to a report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, chronic pain and high-impact chronic…

AHA: 5 Reasons You Could Develop Heart Disease Before 50

FRIDAY, Sept. 14, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, yet people generally associate it with an older, aging population. But heart attacks, strokes and other types of heart disease can be blind to age — particularly when certain factors are in play. Here are…

Calorie Counts on Menus May Be Trimming Americans' Waistlines

FRIDAY, Sept. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — With roughly 40 percent of Americans now obese, new research finds that one strategy may be helping Americans stay slim: calorie counts on restaurant menus. Following the passage of the Affordable Care Act of 2010, chain restaurants with 20 or more franchises must now list a meal’s calorie…

Folic Acid Won't Curb Dangerous Pregnancy Complication

THURSDAY, Sept. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — High doses of folic acid do not protect pregnant women against a sometimes deadly complication called preeclampsia, a large trial suggests. The finding frustrates the search for an effective way to prevent preeclampsia, or dangerously high blood pressure in pregnancy, in women who are at high risk for…

Internal Body Clocks May Affect Timing of Epileptic Seizures

THURSDAY, Sept. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Circadian rhythms, the 24-hour body clocks that regulate a person’s sleep-wake cycle, may affect the timing of seizures in roughly 80 percent of epilepsy patients, researchers report. These findings, which shed new light on seizure patterns, could help doctors treat the disease more effectively, the researchers said. “Understanding…

To Help Beat Heart Disease, Stay Upbeat

THURSDAY, Sept. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Optimism and a sense of purpose can improve your heart health, new research suggests. Psychological well-being has cardiovascular benefits because people with a positive outlook are more inclined to lead a healthy lifestyle, the researchers concluded. Upbeat people are more likely to eat well, engage in physical activity,…

Could Even High-Fat Dairy Be Good for You?

TUESDAY, Sept. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Dairy foods might be your ticket to better heart health, even if you’re drinking whole milk and eating rich cheeses, a new study suggests. The study couldn’t prove cause-and-effect, but folks who ate three servings of dairy per day had an overall lower risk of death during the…

Acne Advice for Returning Students

TUESDAY, Sept. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — As if the start of a new school year isn’t stressful enough, many teens may find their acne worsens when classes start, a skin doctor says. During summer vacation, teens’ acne often eases because they have less stress and more sun exposure, but it could flare up now…

Sexual Violence Haunts Women for Years

TUESDAY, Sept. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Sexual assault leaves many women with permanent indelible memories, a new study finds. Compared with other traumatic life-altering events, the memories of sexual assault remain intense and vivid for years, even when not linked to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the study authors said. “To some extent, it is…

When Blood Sugar Rises in Pregnancy, Mom and Baby Pay the Price

TUESDAY, Sept. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women with high blood sugar during pregnancy run a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes years after giving birth, a new study finds. The finding held true whether or not a woman developed actual “gestational diabetes” during pregnancy, the researchers noted. Babies might also be affected: Children…

Want to Avoid Type 2 Diabetes? Eat More Whole Grains

MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — It may seem counterintuitive, but eating bread, pasta and cereal may actually help prevent type 2 diabetes, as long as those foods are made from whole grains, new research suggests. The study found that each serving of whole-grain foods per day was linked to as much as an…

'No Documented Reason' for 1 in 3 Outpatient Opioid Rxs: Study

MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The United States is in the grip of an epidemic of opioid painkiller addiction. But now, research shows that in nearly a third of cases there’s no medical reason documented for opioids prescribed in an outpatient setting. The findings show the need for stricter rules on recording patients’…

AHA: What's a Dangerous Level of Blood Pressure in Pregnancy?

MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 (American Heart Association) — High blood pressure rates could nearly double in women of childbearing age if the latest guidelines are used, according to a new study. But researchers say more investigation is needed to see if those lower blood pressure targets in pregnant women are safe — or effective. The…

1 in 5 College Students So Stressed They Consider Suicide

MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — College can be so stressful that many students think about killing themselves, and some even try, a new study suggests. Among more than 67,000 students surveyed, over 20 percent said they experienced stressful events in the last year that were strongly associated with mental health problems, including harming…

4 Habits That Lead to Better Food Choices

MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The choices you make every day, both big and small, influence your weight and your health. For instance, do you grab coffee and a donut for breakfast or opt for yogurt with fresh fruit? Understanding why you make the choices you do and how to improve those choices…

Tennis Skills Decline Equally in Male, Female Pros

SATURDAY, Sept. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) — With the U.S. Open championship set to conclude Sunday in New York City, a new study shows that male and female professional tennis players have the same rate of age-related declines in physical ability. This was a surprising finding because men and women have different patterns of aging,…

Exercise Doesn't Affect Timing of Menopause, Study Finds

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — New research seems to settle the question of whether there’s a link between how much a woman works out and her risk of early menopause. The conclusion? There is no link. Previous studies have produced conflicting results, with some suggesting that very active women may be at lower…

AHA: 'Gronk Girl' Tackles Her Second Heart Transplant in 5 Years

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Now that she’s on her third heart, Lauren Meizo knows a good deal about how to live for months in a hospital room, about how her internal organs work together, about how to be patient and tenacious during long periods of recovery. She’s also learned a lot…